Carmel Magazine

CM SP19 Web, 5-19

Issue link: https://www.e-digitaleditions.com/i/1112638

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 163 of 267

Slopes were softened and edges expanded to offer more diverse pin placements and spread out the wear and tear on larger putting sur- faces. The most visible change came on 17, as the face of the front bunker was lowered to offer better visibility to the traditional back-left Sunday pin. "I like all the little tweaks," says McDowell. "Seventeen looks really cool now. It's such an iconic hole, it's nice to now get a little better peek at it." Pebble Beach will play 35 yards longer than it did for the last Open, thanks to new back tees at 9 and 13. But at only 7,075 yards, it's very, very short for the modern game. The USGA has fortified the challenge by dra- matically narrowing the fairways and cultivating thick, juicy rough. "Man, I can't believe how skinny some of those fairways are going to be," 2015 U.S. Open champ Jordan Spieth said at this year's AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, when the new rough lines were already visi- ble. "Driving the ball well is going to be crucial." So, too, will be iron- play, as Pebble Beach's greens are among the tiniest in championship golf, and wayward shots come with a heavy penalty. Other significant changes for this Open include a reshaping of the 11th hole. In 2010, the fairway played down the right side, leaving an awkward angle to a shallow, sloping green. The USGA has wisely shifted the fairway 162 C A R M E L M A G A Z I N E • S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 1 9 At the 2010 U.S. Open, Graeme McDowell of Northern Ireland prevailed in a Sunday dogfight that included five current or future Hall of Famers. Photo: TGO Photography The new Wall of Champions behind the first tee pays tribute to Pebble Beach's rich history, including a bust of patriarch S.F.B. Morse. Photo: Pebble Beach Company

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of Carmel Magazine - CM SP19 Web, 5-19